The Declining Role of “Character of Employment”….

November 7th, 2011 by Marty Rabinovitch

The Declining Role of “Character of Employment” in Determining the Notice Period

“Character of employment” is one of the four factors that the courts consider in determining the notice period when an employee is wrongfully dismissed (the other 3 are age, length of service, and length of time needed for the employee to find a new comparable job). Typically, an employee who worked in an executive, managerial or skilled position is entitled to a longer notice period than an employee whose job is clerical or administrative in nature. This is an example of how the courts have dealt with the “character of employment” factor. The assumption was that there are more higher level positions available than administrative jobs, which means that an employee seeking a new managerial job would typically take longer to find employment than a recently terminated administrative employee.

In Di Tomaso v. Crown Metal Packaging Canada LP, the Ontario Court of Appeal recently considered what the appropriate role of an employee’s “character of employment” should be in determining the notice period. In this case, the employee worked for 33 years as a mechanic and press maintainer, and admitted that this was an unskilled labourer position. At trial, he was awarded a 22 month notice period. Despite the employee’s many years of service, the employer argued for a reduced notice period on the basis of the “character of employment.”

In upholding the 22 month notice period, the Court of Appeal suggested that character of employment is “a factor of declining relative importance,” especially when an employer “attempts to use character of employment to say that low level unskilled employees deserve less notice because they have an easier time finding alternative employment.” It is a proposition that “cannot simply be taken for granted, particularly in today’s world.” In other words, we cannot simply assume that an employee seeking a new managerial job will take longer to find employment than a recently terminated administrative employee, and that the managerial employee should therefore be entitled to a longer notice period.


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